Data Managment IconWhy manage my data?

Data management is good research practice. By managing your data, you can

  • Find and understand your data when needed.
  • Avoid unnecessary duplication.
  • Validate your results if required.
  • Ensure your research is visible and has impact.
  • Get credit when others cite your work.
  • Comply with funder mandates.

If you are still not convinced, watch the video in the For fun... Why data management is important tab below!


When should I start working on my data management plans?

You should start well ahead of collecting your data. Having a plan for organization and storage while collecting your data will save considerable effort later. If you've already collected your data, youe should create your data management plan sooner rather than later, expecially while the details are fresh in your memory.

 

How do I get started?

Begin by reviewing the Helpful questions when planning for data management tab below. Answers to these questions will help wether you decide to ustilize online resources or contact a specialist.

Below is a list of questions that are helpful to answer first before writing your data management plan:

 

  1. What type of data will be produced? Will it be reproducible? What would happen if it got lost or became unusable later?
  2. How much data will it be, and at what growth rate? How often will it change?
  3. Who will use it now, and later?
  4.  Who controls it (PI, student, lab, MIT, funder)?
  5. How long should it be retained? e.g. 3-5 years, 10-20 years, permanently
  6. Are there tools or software needed to create/process/visualize the data?
  7. Any special privacy or security requirements? e.g., personal data, high-security data
  8. Any sharing requirements? e.g., funder data sharing policy
  9. Is there good project and data documentation?
  10. What directory and file naming convention will be used?
  11. What project and data identifiers will be assigned?
  12. What file formats? Are they long-lived?
  13. Storage and backup strategy?
  14. When will I publish it and where?
  15. Is there an ontology or other community standard for data sharing/integration?
  16. Who in the research group will be responsible for data management?

 

OSCER FacilityThis page provides resources for developing National Science Foundation Data Management Plans. According to the NSF:

Proposals submitted ... must include a supplementary document of no more than two pages labeled “Data Management Plan”. This supplementary document should describe how the proposal will conform to NSF policy on the dissemination and sharing of research results. (http://www.nsf.gov/bfa/dias/policy/dmp.jsp)

Writing Data managment Plans for NSF proposals:

  1. Step 1: Data management requirements and plans specific to the Directorate, Office, Division, Program, or other NSF unit, relevant to a proposal are available at: http://www.nsf.gov/bfa/dias/policy/dmp.jsp. GO TO THIS LINK and check your directorate!
  2. Step 2a: If guidance was provided by your directorate, use that information to guide your writing of this section.

    or

    Step 2b: If no guidance is provided by your directorate, use the information in the tabs below to guide your writing of this section or use guidance from another directorate’s summary. The form and instructions from the Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences (AGS) is particularly useful:  

    http://www.nsf.gov/geo/geo-data-policies/ags/ags_data_mgt_form.pdf

  3. Step 3: Send a draft of your data management plan to OU’s Center for Research Program Development and Enrichment (CRPDE) for review (crpde@ou.edu).

DO NOT WAIT UNTIL YOU HAVE AN NSF PROPOSAL DUE TO START WORKING ON YOUR DATA MANAGEMENT PLAN!

 

In addition to CRPDE's resources and assistance, the OU Library has a data management team that can provide individual support and give departmental presentations. For more in formation, contact Mark Laufersweiler (laufers@ou.edu) or Christy Kulp (ckulp@ou.edu). Website: http://guides.ou.edu/datamanagement

The NSF instructions from the Grant Proposal Guide for Data Management Plans are as follows (http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/policydocs/pappguide/nsf14001/gpg_2.jsp#IIC2j):

 

Plans for data management and sharing of the products of research. Proposals must include a supplementary document of no more than two pages labeled “Data Management Plan”. This supplement should describe how the proposal will conform to NSF policy on the dissemination and sharing of research results (see AAG Chapter VI.D.4), and may include:

  1. the types of data, samples, physical collections, software, curriculum materials, and other materials to be produced in the course of the project;
  2. the standards to be used for data and metadata format and content (where existing standards are absent or deemed inadequate, this should be documented along with any proposed solutions or remedies);
  3. policies for access and sharing including provisions for appropriate protection of privacy, confidentiality, security, intellectual property, or other rights or requirements;
  4. policies and provisions for re-use, re-distribution, and the production of derivatives; and
  5. plans for archiving data, samples, and other research products, and for preservation of access to them.

Data management requirements and plans specific to the Directorate, Office, Division, Program, or other NSF unit, relevant to a proposal are available at: http://www.nsf.gov/bfa/dias/policy/dmp.jsp. If guidance specific to the program is not available, then the requirements established in this section apply.

Simultaneously submitted collaborative proposals and proposals that include subawards are a single unified project and should include only one supplemental combined Data Management Plan, regardless of the number of non-lead collaborative proposals or subawards included. FastLane will not permit submission of a proposal that is missing a Data Management Plan. Proposals for supplementary support to an existing award are not required to include a Data Management Plan.

 

A valid Data Management Plan may include only the statement that no detailed plan is needed, as long as the statement is accompanied by a clear justification. Proposers who feel that the plan cannot fit within the supplement limit of two pages may use part of the 15-page Project Description for additional data management information. Proposers are advised that the Data Management Plan may not be used to circumvent the 15-page Project Description limitation. The Data Management Plan will be reviewed as an integral part of the proposal, coming under Intellectual Merit or Broader Impacts or both, as appropriate for the scientific community of relevance.

Other helpful links:

 

NSF’s Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences (AGS) Data Management Plan form is particularly useful:

http://www.nsf.gov/geo/geo-data-policies/ags/ags_data_mgt_form.pdf

 

Courtesy of NYU Health Sciences Library